Rosemary – Interesting Facts

Rosemary sprigs, sporting dark green needles, are reminiscent of fir branches. This herb, which is particularly popular in the Mediterranean cuisine, should not only make its grand appearance during Christmas. After all, this versatile seasoning is a pleasure all year round: rosemary adds a touch of finesse to oil, gives vegetarian dishes a bitter, aromatic note, and goes well with many meat and fish dishes. Rosemary potatoes are a classic side dish, and the Herbes de Provence would simply not work without rosemary.

Rosemary has a rich scent reminiscent of spruce, pine, and frankincense. Its taste is pleasantly astringent and slightly resinous. It calls to mind camphor and vaguely hints of eucalyptus. The aroma of fresh sprigs harvested during or shortly after blossoming is particularly intense.

Food Facts Food Facts
Class Lamiaceae or Labiatae
Ingredients essential oil, tannic and bitter substances
Season mid-April to mid-October (in Switzerland)
Storage fresh herbs in the refrigerator, dried in an airtight container
Shelf life fresh about three weeks in the refrigerator, dried up to one year

Rosemary – Origin and Myth

Rosemary stems from the Mediterranean region and forms an integral part of the Mediterranean cuisine. It grows as an evergreen shrub that can reach a height of up to two metres. Its edible flowers are small, delicate, and range in colour from blue to violet. Rosemary can easily be grown in a pot on the balcony or on the windowsill, but also fares well in your home garden. Its main season is during the warm months between mid-April and mid-October, but depending on the weather, the small rosemary leaves can be harvested all year round.

Rosemary is said to have healing powers and other beneficial properties. In ancient Greece, rosemary was even dedicated to Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty. Today, the herb is mainly appreciated for its aroma and used as seasoning in savoury and even sweet dishes.

Rosemary – Seasoning

You can use rosemary fresh or dried. When whole rosemary sprigs are cooked along with dishes, they are usually removed after preparation. Needles plucked off the sprig and, if necessary, chopped, can remain in the dish to be eaten. Rosemary is best known as an ingredient in marinades for meat dishes, as seasoning in herb bread or butter, and in combination with potatoes.

Definitely not to be missed are the baked goods and other sweet dishes and drinks prepared with rosemary. For example, it is worth seasoning apple or cherry cake with a little rosemary: the dark green herb gives the baking classics a completely new and interesting note. Rosemary tea, which is said to stimulate blood circulation, can be a deliciously refreshing drink, and a sprig of rosemary in lemonade or a long drink is also a highly recommended taste experience. The richly astringent taste of rosemary perfectly complements the other flavours in these drinks.

Suitable recipes

Suitable How-tos

Suitable articles

You are not logged in

Now you can user your Supercard ID to log in to FOOBY easily and conveniently and make use of all the functions and advantages.

Choose a cookbook:

This cookbook already exists.

Delete the entire recipe?

Do you really want to delete this recipe from your cookbook?

Successfully saved!

Saving failed!