Ravioli – More Than Just Canned Food

Ravioli were first introduced to most as a canned food covered in tomato sauce. It was one of the first ready-to-eat pasta dishes and quickly attracted a great deal of attention, fast becoming a popular festival food. For this reason, these Italian pasta parcels are often associated with tasteless fast food. Do not however let this impression fool you! Pasta-lovers know to treasure ravioli, especially when they are homemade. This particular pasta variety comes in the form of two pasta sheets – either in a square, semicircle or a triangular shape – with a pocket of filling in between. The filling can vary from meat, fish and vegetables, to mushrooms, cheese or even cream cheese.

Ravioli originate from the Middle Ages in Italy. The dish originally served the purpose of using up the leftovers from the previous day. The filling therefore consisted of meat, fish or whatever else that could be found in the kitchen, pureed together with bread or vegetables and then filled into the parcels.

Food Facts Food Facts

Ravioli (with beef filling)

Nutritional group

carbohydrate

Calories

182 kcal per 100 g

Nutrients

25g carbohydrate, 1.5g fibre, 4.5g fat, 9g protein per 100g

Storage

refrigerate fresh ravioli

Shelf life

2 to 3 days refrigerated

Ravioli – Handmade at Home

Ravioli dough is quick and easy to make at home. All it contains is flour, eggs and salt. To serve four people, simply mix 400 grams of flour together with 4 eggs, knead the resulting mixture together and leave it covered for half an hour. Then, roll the dough out on a flat surface and cut out circles approximately 5 centimetres in diameter – you can use a cookie cutter or a glass for this. Drop a teaspoon of the filling onto the centre of the pasta circle and clasp it together into a half-moon shape. Finally, gently seal the edges with a fork. Cook the ravioli in salted water for 2 to 3 minutes.

Ravioli – The Common Mistakes

When forming the individual pieces of ravioli, make sure to let as little air as possible into the parcels. Excess air can expand during cooking and tear the dough so that the filling escapes. To avoid this, simply press out the air with your fingers when forming the parcels. The edges of the pasta stick together better when moist. Try to avoid getting flour on the inside edges of the pasta parcel or alternatively moisten the edges of the parcel with either egg yolk or water.

Ravioli – Filling Options

What make ravioli even more exciting is the wide variety of fillings available. Due to the subtle flavour of the pasta dough, you can refine the pasta parcels with just about any filling. Aside from the classic Bolognese filling, there are countless delicious options - perhaps try some baked pumpkin filling or ginger and beetroot. Whether sweet or savoury, when it comes to ravioli fillings, the possibilities are endless.

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