Raspberries – Interesting Facts

Summer time is the season of the raspberry. After all, who can resist the juicy fruit from a market or perhaps your own garden? Even our ancestors loved the fruit. Archeologists have found evidence that raspberries were a staple in the diet of the people of the Stone Age. In the Middle Ages, raspberries were grown in monastery gardens, where they were not only eaten, but also viewed as a medicinal plant. 

Food Facts Food Facts

Raspberries 

Class rubus

Calories

53 kcal per 100 g

Nutrients

6.6g carbohydrate, 4.4g fibre, 1.4g fat, 1.4g protein per 100 g

Season

June to September

Storage

up to 3 days in the fridge

 

 

Raspberries – A Delicate Fruit

The raspberry’s name is deceiving: the red fruit isn’t actually a berry, but an aggregation of drupes. In fact, each small, round segment of the raspberry is an individual stone fruit. Raspberries are very sensitive – too much pressure or heat easily damages them. Be careful when storing or transporting raspberries and make sure you don’t squash them or store them on top of each other.

Raspberries are a non-climacteric fruit, meaning they do not continue to ripen after harvest, so you should only buy ripe raspberries. They are easily recognisable by their rich red colour and firm appearance. Raspberries are in season during the summer. In Switzerland they are harvested from June to September, but are imported all year. Alternatively, frozen raspberries can be found in the frozen section of the supermarket, or try the fruit freeze-dried.

If raspberries grow in your garden you can eat them straight from the shrub, when they are at their tastiest. To be able to profit from the vitamin-rich fruit throughout winter too, simply freeze the berries. Wash and dry them prior to freezing, then distribute them on a large plate, board or baking tray and place in the freezer. As soon as the fruit is completely frozen, you can transfer them to a tin. 

Raspberries – A Colourful Accent for Sweet and Spicy Dishes

As raspberries are very delicate, it is best to eat or use them on the same day as purchase, which shouldn’t pose a problem. Raspberries are very low in calories, but rich in flavour – both sweet and sour. Those who can’t wait to enjoy the fruit eat it raw, in a smoothie or in muesli. Raspberries can also be turned into a fruit puree, ice cream, yoghourt, quark or pudding. Their rich red colour adds a pop of vibrancy to any fruit salad or cake. Raspberry jam is another delicious use of the fruit.

The raspberry flavour is not only found in desserts but also in a variety of spicy dishes. The fruit can add a fresh nuance to savoury salads. Raspberry vinegar can be added to salad dressings and makes a nice contrast to green salad leaves like lamb’s lettuce, romaine lettuce and rocket. A raspberry compote can be the perfect accompaniment to meat and game.

Raspberries – Small Nutritious Wonders

Not only are raspberries delicious, they are also extremely healthy. Raspberries are low in calories, but have plenty of beta-carotene, vitamin C, folate and plant fibre. They also contain large amounts of secondary plant substances like flavonoids. These are antioxidants and have a positive influence on the metabolic processes of the body. The dried leaves of the raspberry plant can be used to make tea, which traditionally treats digestive issues and inflammation in the mouth or throat. 

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