Pangasius – A South East Asian Import

Pangasius is part of the shark catfish family, which are found in the rivers of Asia, particularly the Vietnamese Mekong Delta. They have wide heads with a long, scaleless body and have the whiskers typical for catfish. Fully grown the pangasius can reach a full body length of 1,5 metres. Its characteristic black stripes pale as the fish ages, giving way to a silvery grey colour. Pangasius fillet that is imported to Europe is typically from aquacultures. The main producers of farmed pangasius are South East Asian countries like Vietnam or Cambodia.

Foodfacts Foodfacts

Pangasius

Class

Pangasianodon

Calories

105 kcal per 100 g

Nutrients

0.5g carbohydrates, 0g fibre, 2.5g fat, 19g protein per 100g

Season

available year-round

Storage

store in the fridge at 0°C to 2°C or in the freezer

Shelf life

1 to 2 days in the fridge, up to 3 months in the freezer

Pangasius – Storage

The freshwater fish is usually sold as a filet in the supermarket, either fresh or frozen. As the fresh fish has usually travelled quite a distance it is important to store it on the lowest shelf in the fridge and use on the same day. Of course, pangasius keeps for longer in the freezer. Before preparation leave the frozen filets to thaw slowly in the fridge. This method does take a little longer, but prevents loss of flavour and bacteria from multiplying.

Pangasius – Preparation

Pangasius meat is white, tender and juicy, making it very popular with people who don’t normally like fish. Its mild, very subtle flavour also contributes to that, along with its almost complete lack of bones. Cooking pangasius is very uncomplicated: wash the fillets under running water and dab them dry. Drizzle with a little lemon juice, season with salt and pepper and fry in rapeseed oil or butter.

Grilling and steaming are also good methods of preparation. Its mild aromatic flavour lends itself well to fish curries or crispy breadcrumb coatings. The usual flour, eggs and breadcrumb mixture can be spiced up with a little ginger or parmesan. Alternatively, a pasta bake with pangasius is a great option: cut the fish into bite-sized pieces, fry it in the pan for a few minutes, combine it with other tasty ingredients of your choice and bake in the oven. Pangasius goes particularly well with feta, spinach leaves and tomatoes.

Pangasius – Fillet as Protein Supplier

The nutrient composition of pangasius makes it a great source of protein and one approximately 120 gram pangasius fillet has on average 125 calories and only 0.6 grams carbohydrate. And it doesn’t stop there: what pangasius lacks in fat, it makes up for in protein – almost 23 grams. Protein plays an important part in putting on and maintaining muscle mass and maintains healthy muscles.

You are not logged in

Now you can user your Supercard ID to log in to FOOBY easily and conveniently and make use of all the functions and advantages.

Choose a cookbook:

This cookbook already exists.

Delete the entire recipe?

Do you really want to delete this recipe from your cookbook?

Successfully saved!

Saving failed!